Internships

We have an ongoing application process for students that are seeking internships opportunities for academic credit. Currently we are working with the International Affairs Department at the University of Colorado at Boulder to coordinate internships for CU students. If you are a student (undergraduate or graduate) at another institution and are interested in applying, we’d love to hear from you.

What will you be doing?

You’ll be working alongside us producing the same kinds of content that we publish. All of your work will be published under your name on our website. The core of the your work will be synthesizing topics related to national security and providing policy recommendations.

What’s in it for you?

Finding the solution is only half the battle. To truly make the world a better place, we must sell our ideas and ensure that they reach the right people. We’ll show you how to spread your ideas instead of just being lost in the shuffle. After working with us, you’ll know how to get yourself heard.

Is this a good opportunity for you?

  • Read “The Why” page. If this resonates with you, definitely get in touch with us.
  • There will be a lack of structure. While you will work with other interns and contributors to Hand of Reason and receive plenty of feedback on your work, you will be responsible for setting your hours and completing assignments on your own. If you thrive without structure, this will be a great fit.
  • Anyone pursing careers in academia, policy making, NGOs and other careers that draw directly from the discipline of international affairs/relations will find the internship incredibly useful.
  • You must love reading and analytical writing. Reading and writing loads are substantial. If reading and summarizing one of the primer academic journals in political science, international relations, or sociology sounds like a terrible idea, this is probably not the best opportunity for you.
  • You must also enjoying critiquing arguments while seeking to evolve your own understanding. The issues we explore are¬†incredibly¬†complex and do not easily lend themselves to solutions. In order to better explore these complexities, we make a point of critiquing every argument even if we completely agree with it. Your opinions on policy will be challenged and you’ll be reevaluating your positions constantly.